Published On: Mon, May 10th, 2021

Dr. Alex George reveals tragic brother Llŷr gave his backing to Love Island star’s new book

‘He was very proud of what I was doing’: Dr. Alex George reveals tragic brother Llŷr supported Love Island star’s new mental health book before taking his own life

  • If you have been affected by this story, you can call the Samaritans on 116 123 or visit www.samaritans.org

Former Love Island star Dr. Alex George admits his late brother was proud of his efforts to help people with mental health issues before tragically taking his own life.  

The A&E doctor – appointed by Prime Minister Boris Johnson as a youth mental health ambassador for the government in February – confirmed the death of younger brother Llŷr, aged 19, last July. 

But Alex, 30, has revealed the young student gave his full backing to new self-help book Live Well Every Day: Your Plan For a Happy Body And Mind, written by the Love Island star at the height of the coronavirus pandemic for those struggling with mental and physical problems. 

Support: Former Love Island star Dr. Alex George admits his late brother was proud of his efforts to help people with mental health issues before tragically taking his own life

Promoting the book on Monday’s edition of Lorraine, he said: ‘He was very proud. I had written some of it during pandemic and my brother was very proud of what I was doing. 

‘Particularly he shared my passion for mental health, the idea of giving people the tool kit for how to care for themselves. I know how excited he was for the book. 

‘Not to sound cliché with it but when he passed It was really a big focus point for me and I thought I’m going to get this book finished.’

The new book, which addresses issues including anxiety, social pressure and mental instability in the modern age, will be available to purchase from May 13th. 

Devastating: The A&E doctor confirmed the death of younger brother Llŷr, aged 19, last July

Devastating: The A&E doctor confirmed the death of younger brother Llŷr, aged 19, last July

And Alex admits he was keen to plough ahead with completing it despite publishing house Aster giving him the opportunity to delay publication following the devastating loss of his brother.

He recalled: ‘My publishers were amazing, they wanted to pause it. It gave me a sense of purpose, something to really work towards.’ 

The former Love Island contestant has also channeled his energy into a new role as youth mental health ambassador for the government following his appointment by the Prime Minister earlier this year. 

‘I had a call with some young people only last week,’ he said. ‘They did ask about brother. I was being very open, that this is how challenging life can be sometimes.

‘I can talk about it, it’s nothing I should be ashamed of. Some people are too afraid to ask for help, but they can actually come out and do so.’

Opening up: Appearing on Monday's Lorraine, Alex has revealed the young student gave his full backing to new self-help book Live Well Every Day: Your Plan For a Happy Body And Mind

Opening up: Appearing on Monday’s Lorraine, Alex has revealed the young student gave his full backing to new self-help book Live Well Every Day: Your Plan For a Happy Body And Mind

Devastating: 'He was very proud. I had written some of it during pandemic and my brother was very proud of what I was doing,' he explained (pictured together at Alex's graduation when Llŷr was 14)

Devastating: ‘He was very proud. I had written some of it during pandemic and my brother was very proud of what I was doing,’ he explained (pictured together at Alex’s graduation when Llŷr was 14)

In March, Alex shared his delight after £79million was approved by the government for youth mental health. 

And although celebrating the good news and saying he was so happy ‘he could cry’, the doctor told social media followers that ‘the work doesn’t end here, this is just the start’. 

In a candid interview for G2 in The Guardian last month, he also admitted that throwing himself into work has helped him to cope with his brother’s passing, as he still finds it ‘tough’ when he actually stops to think about it. 

He said: ‘I think of grief as a little black box in my head. That box, it’s always in the house. You’re not focused on it, but it’s always there.’ 

If you have been affected by this story, you can call the Samaritans on 116 123 or visit www.samaritans.org.  

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